EHS Annual Conference 2024 – Provisional Programme

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Northumbria University
CCE1 Building
(Faculty of Business & Law)

5 – 7 April 2024

Provisional Conference Programme


Friday 5 April

0900-1030       Meeting of Economic History Society Publications Committee (Room 222)

1030-1330        Meeting of Economic History Society Council (Room 221)

1200-1700        Registration (CCE1 Foyer)

1400-1530        New Researchers’ Session I (8 parallel sessions)

NRIA:      Education and Opportunity
(chair: Neil Cummins) (Room 007)

Railroad expansion, local shocks and individual opportunities: Evidence from 19th-century America
Maxence Castiello & Clément Bosquet (Panthéon-Sorbonne Paris-1)

Grim up North? Regional intergenerational mobility in England, 1881-1911
Ziming Zhu (London School of Economics)

Educational expansion in the Cape Colony, 1881-1920
Sarah Ferber (University of Tübingen) & Johan Fourie (Stellenbosch University)

NRIB:      Gender and Political Action
(chair: Bernard Harris) (Room 024)

Breaking boundaries: Women, labour unions and political activism in early 20th century Germany
Iris Wohnsiedler (Trinity College Dublin)

Seeing political institutions in historical context: Women’s work in textile manufacturing and the development of English political institutions in the global economy, 1688-1722
Hugo Bromley (University of Cambridge)

Collective action and gender role: Evidence from women suffrage demonstrations
Jade Ponsard (Aixe-Marseille University)

NRIC:      Climate, Migration and Adaptation
(chair: Eric Strobl) (Room 223A)

The choice to leave: Determinants of migration in the Lower Yangzi region, 1700-1930
Christoph Hess (University of Cambridge)

Gender conflicts on the shopfloor: Barcelona women at Chocolates Amatller, 1890-1914
Xavier Jou (Universitat de Barcelona)

Impact of natural disasters on school attendance: A comparative study from colonial Jamaica
Joel Hüsler (University of Bern)

NRID:      Finance in Colonial India
(chair: Michael Aldous) (Room 223B)

Failure of rupee devaluation of September 1931 to reflect as an expansionary influence on Indian economy
Vikramaditya Awasthy (University of Hyderabad)

Accounting for textile trade in the English and Dutch East India Companies, c.1700 – 1800
Rohit Prabu (European University Institute)

NRIE:      Land Reform and Political Economy
(chair: Tony Moore) (Harvard 402)

The sea is history: Estate management, land use, and risk calculation on the late medieval and early-modern English coastline, c.1350-1600
Alexander Hibberts (Durham University)

British political directors over the long run: 1880-2019
Linxiang Ma (University of Strathclyde) & Lyndon Moore (Monash University)

Land without masters: Local political competition since the Peruvian Land Reform, 1969-80
Héctor Paredes (Paris School of Economics)

NRIF:      Money and Interest Rates
(chair: Edmund Cannon) (Harvard 403)

New consumer desires in times of economic difficulties: The case of Catalonia, 1400-60
Aina Palarea Marimon (Independent scholar)

Under the veil of money: Long-term effects of monetary policy on silver flows, 1575-1680
Víctor Pérez-Sánchez (London School of Economics)

18th-century Irish interest rates: Determinants and impacts
Paul Kelly (London School of Economics)

NRIG:      The Adoption and Transfer of Technology
(chair: Jane Humphries) (Room 409)

Cyanide on the Rand: Competing methods of technology transfer
Muhan Hu (Universities of Melbourne & Strathclyde) & Lyndon Moore (Monash University)

Why Britain? The right place (in the technology space) at the right time
Lukas Rosenberger (LMU Munich), Carl Hallmann & Walker Hanlon (Northwestern University)

Mechanised production in a peasant economy: The transfer and expansion of steam roller ginning in the Bombay Presidency, 1860-1920
Shankar Nair (King’s College London)

NRIH:      Long-Run Growth
(chair: Stephen Broadberry) (Room 410)

Rethinking the impact of economic growth: A comparative study of rural market and peasant economies in early-modern Italy, 1650-1800
Alberto Concina (KU Leuven)

Longer-run equilibrium interest rates: Evidence from the United Kingdom
Omar Kaykhusraw (King’s College London)

Accounting for China’s growth, 1840-2010
Menggelisha (University of Oxford)

1530-1600        Tea (CCE1 Foyer)

1600-1730        New Researchers’ Session II (8 parallel sessions)

NRIIA:     Women and Poverty
(chair: Jane Whittle) (Room 007)

Using time data to understand gender differences in working hours in England, 1700-1850
Nicholas Collins (University of Exeter)

Women and property: not just the 10%
Catherine Ryan (Teesside University)

Money and the historical indices of wealth and poverty in 19th- and 20th- century Southern Nigeria
Ifeosa Nkem-Onyekpe (Harvard University)

NRIIB:     Ideology and Repression
(chair: Max-Stephan Schulze) (Room 024)

Effects of political violence: The Nazis’ ‘Fight for Berlin’
Monique Reiske (Humboldt Universität zu Berlin)

Red Rage: Secret policing and political divide in the Russian Empire
Julia Zimmermann (Trinity College Dublin) & Theocharis Grigoriadis (Freie Universität Berlin)

The political legacy of 19th-century politicisation and repression in Southeastern France
Antoine Boucher (Université Paris Dauphine)

NRIIC:     Business History
(chair: Jennifer Aston) (Room 223A)

Female artisans and freedom of trade in Southern Sweden, 1840-90
Johanne Arnfred (Lund University)

Repairing organisational trust after a crisis: Lessons from English banking , 1836-38
Alvin Chan (Sunway Business School, Malaysia), Carolyn Downs & James Taylor (Lancaster University)

The role of financial, human and social capital and trust in partnership formation for expatriate merchants 1840-1920: Danish merchants in Newcastle-upon-Tyne
Daniel Riddell (Northumbria University)

NRIID:     Taxation and Organisation
(chair: Oscar Gelderblom) (Room 223B)

A pre-modern Entscheidungsgesellschaft? Decision-making and the development of urban institutions in Bremen, 12th-16th centuries
Alexander Collin (University of Amsterdam)

From Salt to Strife: Fiscal disunion and state legitimacy
Joseph Enguehard (École normale supérieure de Lyon), Eva Davoine & Igor Kolesnikov (UC Berkeley)

How to raise taxes and win the election: Political competition and the introduction of personal income tax in Italy 1960s-1980s
Paolo Bozzi (Humboldt Universität zu Berlin)

NRIIE:     Long-Term Effects of Shocks and Interventions
(chair: Nuno Palma) (Harvard 402)

Life-long effects from cash transfers in childhood: The 1938 child allowance reform in Sweden
Louise Cormack (Lund University)

The persistence of Son Preference: Cultural transmission of Chinese migrants in Taiwan
Yifan Zhang (Toulouse School of Economics)

The pearls of land settlement policies and agrarian reform in Ecuador
Adrian Nicholas Gachet (University of Manchester)

NRIIF:     Capitalism and Economic Thought
(chair: Paul Kosmetatos) (Harvard 403)

Theorising money in social research: Power, temporality, and monetary constraints in post-war Eastern Europe
Szinan Radi (University of Cambridge)

Industrial development in Austria-Hungary in the 19th century: Role of entrepreneurs and management
Lucie Mařanová (Prague University of Economics & Business)

The influence of German economic thought on Spanish industrialisation and tariff policy, 1870-1906
Guillermo Antuña (Universidad de Barcelona)

NRIIG:     Inequality
(chair: Julie Marfany) (Room 409)

Wealth inequality and agrarian systems: A case study for north-eastern Spain at the end of pre-industrial times
Josep Mas-Ferrer (University of Girona)

Occupational structure and inequality in wages: Agriculture in Saxony in the 18th and 19th centuries
Florian Probst (University of Münster) & Oscar Dube (University of Halle-Wittenberg)

What is real? Consumer prices, living standards and inequality, Amsterdam, 1600-1800
Bas Spliet (Universities of Antwerp & Brussels)

NRIIH:     Warfare
(chair: Victoria Gierok) (Room 410)

From alien to citizen: The power of inclusive propaganda during World War I
Joung Yeob Ha (University of Pittsburgh)

Morally motivated violence: A fairness determinant of war participation in WWII
Guohui Jiang (University of Zurich)

The social and economic implications of long-term disability from First World War chemical warfare
Shelley Castle (University of Oxford)

1730-1830        Open meeting for women in economic history (all welcome) (Harvard Room 402)

1815-1900        Council reception for NRs and 1st-time delegates (CCE1 Foyer)

1900-1945        Plenary lecture (Lecture Theatre 002)

            ‘Heathen Money’: The Beatles, God, and Cold War Economics in the US South
             Brian Ward (Northumbria University)

2000-2115        Dinner (Domain, Students’ Union)

2115-2130        Meeting of NR Prize Committee (Training Room 1 & 2, Students’ Union)

Bar available until late (Habita, Students’ Union)


Saturday 6 April

0900-1030        Academic Session I (8 parallel sessions)

ASIA:    Infant Health
(chair: Eric Schneider) (Room 007)

The milk of human kindness. Breastfeeding in England: extent and value
Jane Humphries (University of Oxford)

Maternal death and children’s survival in Suriname, birth years 1848-63
Kristina Thompson (Wageningen University), Björn Quanjer & Matthias Rosenbaum-Feldbrügge (Radboud University)

Selection, distribution and change in birth weights during crisis and growth periods in an urban near-complete count data, 1921-45
Sakari Saaritsa & Jarmo Peltola (University of Helsinki)

ASIB:    London Money Markets and the Bank of England
(chair: Paolo Di Martino) (Room 024)

The price of loyalty: Optionality features in British Government Bonds, 1797-1805
Pamfili Antipa (Sciences Po & Banque de France) & Stéphane Guibaud (Sciences Po)

The making of safe assets: London acceptance houses and the intermediation of bills of exchange, 1880-1914
Olivier Accominotti, Aurelius Noble (London School of Economics) & Stefano Ugolini (University of Toulouse)

The Bank of England and economic expertise, 1926-39
Robert Yee (University of Oxford)

ASIC:    Fiscal-Military State Capacity
(chair: Ali Coşkun Tunçer) (Room 223A)

Growing pains: Transactions costs and the development of fiscal capacity
Karolina Hutkova (London School of Economics), Ernesto Dal Bó, Lukas Leucht (UC Berkeley) & Noam Yuchtman (University of Oxford)

Loyalty-competence tradeoff in the military: The effects of institutional counterbalancing and military control in medieval China
Joy Chen (Cheung Kong Graduate School of Business) & Erik Wang (New York University)

Food-market integration, humanitarian-relief policy and fiscal capacity: the case of the Great Irish Famine of 1845-52
Charles Read (University of Cambridge)

ASID:    Conflict and Commonalities in British Colonies
(chair: Helen Paul) (Room 223B)

Canoes, commons, and capitalism’s debt to indigenous technology in the early English Caribbean
Nuala Zahedieh (University of Cambridge)

An historical perspective on climate and conflict: The Australian Frontier Wars, 1806-1924
Robert Elliott, Matthew Cole (University of Birmingham), Joel Hüsler, Constanza Fileccia & Eric Strobl (University of Bern)

Irish Home Rule: Promised land or ‘grotesque abortion’? Visions of Ireland’s self-governed economic future, 1912-20
Anna Devlin (Trinity College Dublin)

ASIE:    Age and Gender in Labour
(chair: Jordan Claridge) (Harvard 402)

Age, sex, and industriousness: Spinning incomes in Sweden, 1767-97
Kathryn Gary, Malin Nilsson & Mats Olsson (Lund University)

All at work? Tracing patterns of irregular labour in industrialising Belgium, 1700-1860
Wouter Ryckbosch (Vrije Universiteit Brussel)

Child labour in England and Wales, 1851-1911
Xuesheng You (Cardiff University) & Leigh Shaw-Taylor (University of Cambridge)

ASIF:    Administrative Practices and Resource Management in Early Modern Europe
(chair: Janet Casson) (Room 409)

The queen as lady of the manor: The economic agency of the Tudor Queen Consorts in relation to their manorial interests
Elizabeth Norton (Independent scholar)

Danish queens managing industries, c.1650-1750
Cathleen Sarti (University of Oxford)

The Thirty Years’ War and the decline of urban Germany
Victoria Gierok (University of Oxford)

ASIG:    Culture and Narratives
(chair: Juliana Jaramillo) (Harvard 403)

How ideas around isolation and expansion have shaped the modern world economy
Marvin Suesse (Trinity College Dublin)

British industrialisation and cultural change: Evidence from the use of proverbs
Melanie Meng Xue (London School of Economics) & Elliott Ash (ETH Zürich)

Narratives from European-African encounters, 1400-1900
Alexander Moradi (University of Bozen-Bolzano), Edward Kerby & Hanjo Odendaal (Stellenbosch University)

ASIH:    Skills and Mobility
(chair: Linda Perriton) (Room 410)

Gender-based labour legislation and employment: Historical evidence from the United States
Joanne Haddad (Université Libre de Bruxelles) & Lamis El Kattan (Georgetown University)

Skill premium in Sweden, 1900–1950
Suvi Heikkuri (University of Gothenburg)

Skilled labour inflows and economic growth: Theory and evidence from post-war Germany
Richard Franke (Trinity College Dublin & CEPH), Sebastian Till Braun, Sarah Maria Stricker (University of Bayreuth) & Florian Trouvain (Princeton University)

0900-1030        Meet the Editor (by invitation only) (Room 018)

1030-1100        Coffee (CCE1 Foyer)

1100-1230        Academic Session II (8 parallel sessions)

ASIIA:   Family and Famine in Russia
(chair: Christopher Briggs) (Room 409)

Wealth, inequality and sex: The changes in female and male wealth and their consequences for the governance of the Russian Empire, 1700s-1850s
Elena Korchmina (University of Bologna)

Culture, economic stress, and missing girls
Viktor Malein (Lund University), Tamar Matiashvili (Stanford University) & Francisco J. Beltrán Tapia (Norwegian University of Science & Technology)

The legacy of The Great Famine: Shaping contemporary identity
Lamis El Kattan (Georgetown University), Joanne Haddad (Université Libre de Bruxelles) & Björn Brey (University of Oxford)

ASIIB:   Banking Crises
(chair: Pamfili Antipa) (Room 007)

Bank runs under fullish information: Vienna, 1848, and Ljubljana, 1908/09
Jure Stojan (Institute for Strategic Solutions, Slovenia)

Why the Bank of England ignored Bagehot: The Barings crisis of 1890 revisited
Eugene White (Rutgers University)

J.P. Morgan: The making of a Private Lender of Last Resort, 1882-96
Mary Tone Rodgers (State University NY at Oswego) & Jon Moen (University of Mississippi)

ASIIC:   Institutions in Central Europe
(chair: Nikolaus Wolf) (Room 223A)

Was the industrial revolution censored in Austria before 1848? Useful human capital and institutional change in the wake of the 1848 revolutions
Tomas Cvrcek (University College London)

Property protection and technological inertia: Evidence from Switzerland’s electrification
Jacob Weisdorf (Sapienza University of Rome) & Björn Brey (University of Oxford)

ASIID:   Coercion and Markets in Africa
(chair: Leigh Gardner) (Room 223B)

Living standards in Angola, 1760-1975
Nuno Palma (Universities of Manchester & Lisbon, CEPR) & Hélder Carvalhal (University of Manchester)

Why extractive institutions? The choice between free and forced labour in colonial French Africa
Federico Tadei (University of Barcelona)

East African food market integration, 1920-2020
Michiel de Haas (Wageningen University)

ASIIE:   Work and Gender in Pre-Industrial Italy
(chair: Mattia Fochesato) (Harvard 402)

Resurfacing lost labour: Women’s work in early-modern mines
Gabriele Marcon (I Tatti – The Harvard Center for Renaissance Studies)

Exploring women’s work in early-modern rural Italy: Insights from the Republic of Venice
Mattia Viale & Andrea Caracausi (University of Padova)

Women at work in rural areas: Family, servanthood and mobility in 18th-century Piedmont
Beatrice Zucca Micheletto (University of Turin)

ASIIF:   Early-Modern Anglo-Dutch Finance
(chair: Joris van den Tol) (Room 024)

The first bear raid and short squeeze: The Dutch East India Company in 1609
Oscar Gelderblom (University of Antwerp), Abe de Jong (Groningen University) & Joost Jonker (University of Amsterdam)

A financier in Georgian England: The case of Jacob Kirkman, 1710-92
Diane Clements & Philip Winterbottom (University of London)

Anglo-Dutch financial connections and contrasts in the late 18th century: The Amsterdam phase of the 1772-3 credit crisis
Paul Kosmetatos (University of Edinburgh) & Stein Berre (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

ASIIG:   Marriage and Fertility Decline
(chair: Eric Schneider) (Harvard 403)

Why was marriage so uncommon in post-emancipation colonial Jamaica?
Eric Strobl (University of Bern)

Religion and the fertility decline: New insights from the Universe of Württemberg Parishes, 1871-1930
Richard Franke (Trinity College Dublin), Timur Öztürk & Sebastian Braun (University of Bayreuth)

Understanding the relationship between women’s education and fertility decline: Evidence from Colombia
Juliana Jaramillo (Central Bank of Colombia)

ASIIH:   Ideology and Ideas
(chair: Marvin Suesse) (Room 410)

The diffusion of Yangming ideas and its impact on economic and political development
Xizi Luo & Melanie Meng Xue (London School of Economics)

Long-run consequences of propaganda in the classroom
Matti Mitrunen (University of Helsinki) & Jakko Meriläinen (Stockholm School of Economics)

The burden of memory: Persistence of ethnic conflict in Yugoslavia
Leonard Kukić (Universidad Carlos III de Madrid)

1100-1230        Meet the Editor (by invitation only) (Room 018)

1230-1330        Lunch (CCE1 Foyer)

1315-1400        New Researcher Poster Session (CCE1 Foyer)

The legacy of the French Protectorate on education in Morocco
Amélie Allegre (University of East Anglia)

Institutional investors in the art market: The collection of the National Gallery, London 1824-1994
Luisa Bicalho Ritzkat (London School of Economics)

Transportation in late 17th and 18th century China
Ruoran Cheng (London School of Economics)

From uncertainty to risk: How merchants mitigated and accepted maritime risk, 1680-1740
David Gagie (University of York)

Manorial accounts and the audit in 14th century England and Wales
Jerome Gasson (University of Cambridge)

The trade effects of the plague: The Saminiati and Guasconi Bank of Florence, 1626-1634
Fabio Gatti (University of Bern)

How to solve the tariff-growth paradox? Empirical evidence, German empire, 1880-1913
Sebastian Geschonke (Humboldt University Berlin)

Bugged out: Locust plagues and internal migration patterns in the 19th century US
Aurélie Gillen, Luisito Bertinelli (University of Luxembourg) & Eric Strobl (University of Bern)

The recipe to sweet success: Competitive advantages in a chocolatier family dynasty, 1797-1936
Xavier Jou (Universitat de Barcelona)

Industrial protection of an agricultural economy: Nominal tariffs in Argentina, 1895-1951
Juan Pablo Juliá (Gothenburg University)

Crowding-out private investment: Italy’s credit crunch and fiscal policy in the 1930s
Gino Magnini (University of Edinburgh)

Fighting for free enterprise: Business, Neoliberalism and Conservatism in Britain, 1945-79
Joseph Moore (University of Manchester)

‘Men must fight, and women must work – and weep’: New opportunities for women clerks in wartime City of London Banks?, 1914-1918
Kirsty Peacock (University of Oxford)

What caused the greatest Tudor rebellion?
Nicholas Peyton (London School of Economics)

Firm formation in the Tsarist Russian Empire: The effect of the Polish Revolt
Mariya Sakharova (Aix-Marseille University)

Autarky and industrial development: Anglo/Italian productivity gap in the late 1930s
Tancredi Salamone (Sant’Anna School of Advanced Studies)

How revolutionary were the French Revolutions? Wealth mobility in France, 1791-1870
Noah Sutter (London School of Economics)

Friends or rivals? Social capital and intergenerational mobility in colonial India
Cyril Thomson (University of Padua)

Big lender or big spender? The role of the Cassa per il Mezzogiorno in the development of Southern Italy
Michele Zampa (Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies)

Greener on the other side? Motivations of Chinese migration into the Shanghai International Settlement, 1885-1935
Qingrou Zhao (University of Edinburgh)

Kinship networks and emigration: A case study of 19th– and early 20th-century Guangdong, China
Tianning Zhu (London School of Economics)

1340-1400     Launch and Demonstration (Room: Harvard 402)
                              A resource for teaching the economic history of England and Wales, 1600-1911 (https://www.economiespast.org)
Professor Leigh Shaw-Taylor (Director, CamPop, University of Cambridge)

1400-1530        Academic Session III (8 parallel sessions)

ASIIIA:  Welfare Across the Life-Cycle
(chair: Bernard Harris) (Room 007)

Emerging worlds of welfare familism: The development of family policies in Western European Countries, 1880-1960
Guillem Verd-Llabrés (University of Barcelona)

Determinants of gainful employment and retirement: using micro-level data from Swedish Censuses 1880-1910
Tobias Karlsson, Helene Castenbrandt & Luciana Quaranta (Lund University)

The economic consequences of being widowed by war: A life-cycle perspective
Sebastian Braun (University of Bayreuth) & Jan Stuhler (Universidad Carlos III de Madrid)

ASIIIB:  Nineteenth-Century Banking
(chair: Mary Tone Rodgers) (Room 024)

Foreign banking in Egypt: Origins, impact and a case-study of the Ionian Bank, 1850s-1950s
John Wilson (Northumbria University), Akram Benianim (University of Oxford) & Neveen Abdelrehim (Newcastle University)

Branching for caution: Banks in England and Wales during the 1878 financial panic
Jinlin Wei (University of Warwick)

Banks of issues and the integration of the national credit market in Italy, 1894-1913
Marianna Astore & Paolo Di Martino (University of Turin)

ASIIIC:  Economic Warfare
(chair: Charles Read) (Room 223A)

World War I: Preparations, conduct and consequences of economic warfare
Stephen Broadberry (University of Oxford)

Economic sanctions and the Italo-Abyssinian War
Mattia Bertazzini (University of Nottingham), Jari Eloranta & Elina Kuorelahti (University of Helsinki)

Rise of the paper tigers? UN sanctions in Rhodesia and South Africa
Leigh Gardner (London School of Economics) & Martine Mariotti (Australian National University)

ASIIID:  Envisioning Future Profits in Early-Modern Long-Distance Trade
(chair: Elisabeth Heijmans) (Room 223B)

Between certainty and uncertainty: The extent of future thinking in early-modern Portuguese merchant letters
Edgar Pereira (University of Coimbra)

Expecting sweet returns: Investing in sugar and slavery in Dutch Brazil, 1630-54
Erik Odegard (International Institute of Social History)

‘Ruinous to our commerce’: Communicating the future and volatility in the Mhamai Kamat network
Noelle Richardson (Leiden University)

ASIIIE:  Female Occupational Structure and Labour Force
(chair: Leigh Shaw-Taylor) (Harvard 402)

Female labour, regional inequality, and the industrial revolution: The case of Belgium, 1846-1910
Erik Buyst (KU Leuven)

Agricultural practices, organised workers and female political empowerment: Evidence from Italian Mondine
Luca Bagnato (UCLA), Miriam Venturini & Yu Pan (University of Zurich)

Historical roots of the dual-earner model: Women’s labour force participation in Sweden, 1870-1960
Jakob Molinder (Uppsala & Lund Universities)

ASIIIF:  Infrastructure and Innovation
(chair: Stuart Henderson) (Room 409)

‘The usual clause to supply the service’: The British State and the search for new inventions during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars
Joseph Lane (University of Reading) & Stephen Billington (Ulster University)

Conquering nature: How the Gotthard Tunnel changed the European economy
Nikolaus Wolf (Humboldt Universität zu Berlin) & Carlo Ciccarelli (Tor Vergata, Rome)

Seasonality and development in India: History and empirics
Vigyan Ratnoo & Maanik Nath (Utrecht University)

ASIIIG: Public Health and the Environment
(chair: Kristina Thompson) (Harvard 403)

How to vaccinate the masses? Safety, compulsion, and the success of vaccination policy in 19th-century Britain
Jonathan Chapman (University of Bologna)

The effect of regulating the sex trade in a laissez-faire environment: Evidence from Britain’s Contagious Disease Acts
Grant Goehring (Boston University) & Walker Hanlon (Northwestern University)

The 1866 Cholera Epidemic and the sanitary revolution in Germany
Daniel Gallardo-Albarrán (Wageningen University) & Kalle Kappner (LMU Munich)

ASIIIH:  Housing
(chair: Chris Colvin) (Room 410)

The price of housing in the United States, 1890-2006
Ronan Lyons (Trinity College Dublin), Allison Shertzer (Federal Reserve) & Rowena Gray (UC Merced)

Urban wealth inequality in the Ottoman Empire, 1650-1870
Ali Coşkun Tunçer (University College London) & Gürer Karagedikli (Middle East Technical University)

The market mightier than the family? A case study of land market exchange rural Holland, 1555-1684
Bram Hilkens (Erasmus University)

1400-1530        Meet the Editor (by invitation only) (Room 0.18)

1530-1600        New Researcher Poster Session (CCE1 Foyer)

The legacy of the French Protectorate on education in Morocco
Amélie Allegre (University of East Anglia)

Institutional investors in the art market: The collection of the National Gallery, London 1824-1994
Luisa Bicalho Ritzkat (London School of Economics)

Transportation in late 17th and 18th century China
Ruoran Cheng (London School of Economics)

From uncertainty to risk: How merchants mitigated and accepted maritime risk, 1680-1740
David Gagie (University of York)

Manorial accounts and the audit in 14th century England and Wales
Jerome Gasson (University of Cambridge)

The trade effects of the plague: The Saminiati and Guasconi Bank of Florence, 1626-1634
Fabio Gatti (University of Bern)

How to solve the tariff-growth paradox? Empirical evidence, German empire, 1880-1913
Sebastian Geschonke (Humboldt University Berlin)

Bugged out: Locust plagues and internal migration patterns in the 19th century US
Aurélie Gillen, Luisito Bertinelli (University of Luxembourg) & Eric Strobl (University of Bern)

The recipe to sweet success: Competitive advantages in a chocolatier family dynasty, 1797-1936
Xavier Jou (Universitat de Barcelona)

Industrial protection of an agricultural economy: Nominal tariffs in Argentina, 1895-1951
Juan Pablo Juliá (Gothenburg University)

Crowding-out private investment: Italy’s credit crunch and fiscal policy in the 1930s
Gino Magnini (University of Edinburgh)

Fighting for free enterprise: Business, Neoliberalism and Conservatism in Britain, 1945-79
Joseph Moore (University of Manchester)

‘Men must fight, and women must work – and weep’: New opportunities for women clerks in wartime City of London Banks?, 1914-1918
Kirsty Peacock (University of Oxford)

What caused the greatest Tudor rebellion?
Nicholas Peyton (London School of Economics)

Firm formation in the Tsarist Russian Empire: The effect of the Polish Revolt
Mariya Sakharova (Aix-Marseille University)

Autarky and industrial development: Anglo/Italian productivity gap in the late 1930s
Tancredi Salamone (Sant’Anna School of Advanced Studies)

How revolutionary were the French Revolutions? Wealth mobility in France, 1791-1870
Noah Sutter (London School of Economics)

Friends or rivals? Social capital and intergenerational mobility in colonial India
Cyril Thomson (University of Padua)

Big lender or big spender? The role of the Cassa per il Mezzogiorno in the development of Southern Italy
Michele Zampa (Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies)

Greener on the other side? Motivations of Chinese migration into the Shanghai International Settlement, 1885-1935
Qingrou Zhao (University of Edinburgh)

Kinship networks and emigration: A case study of 19th– and early 20th-century Guangdong, China
Tianning Zhu (London School of Economics)

1530-1600        Tea (CCE1 Foyer)

1600-1730        Academic Session IV (8 parallel sessions)

ASIVA:  Mortality
(chair: Eric Schneider) (Room 007)

The wheel of life: The effect of the abolition of the ruota on infant mortality in 19th-century Italy
Giuliana Freschi (Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna) & Marco Molteni (University of Oxford & Geneva Graduate Institute)

Rethinking the geography of distress in 19th-century Ireland: Excess mortality and the Land War
Eoin McLaughlin (Heriot Watt University) & Niall Whelehan (University of Strathclyde)

Morbidity among working-class men and women in early 20th-century Sweden
Bernard Harris (University of Strathclyde), Liselotte Eriksson (Umeå University) & Lars Fredrik Andersson (Stockholm University)

ASIVB:  International Financial Networks and Innovation
(chair: Catherine Schenk) (Room 024)

Why are corporations terminated? A century of evidence from the Netherlands
Philip Fliers, Chris Colvin (Queen’s University Belfast), Abe de Jong (University of Groningen & Monash University) & Florian Madertoner (Erasmus University Rotterdam)

The introduction of the British debit card at the dawn of the digital economy, 1980s-1990s
Gordon Mayze (Newcastle University), Bernardo Batiz-Lazo (Northumbria University) & Tom Buckley (University of Sussex)

ASIVC:  Politics in the Long Run
(chair: Cathleen Sarti) (Room 223A)

The borders of Christendom: Protestant-Catholic fault lines in Western Europe
Fernando Arteaga (University of Pennsylvania) & Ernesto L’huillier (Harrisburg University)

Administrative capacity and state elite relationships in Mughal South Asia, 1556-1707
Safya Morshed (London School of Economics)

ASIVD:  China: Medieval to Modern
(chair: Melanie Meng Xue) (Room 223B)

Toward the Great Divergence: Agricultural growth in the Yangzi Delta, 1393-1953
Runzhuo Zhai (Renmin University of China)

Divergent paths in Eurasian migration: A new estimate of internal migration in 18th- and 19th-century China
Cheng Yang & Yuankai Jin (Renmin University of China)

Rural wages in modern Shanghai and Suzhou: Evidence from state-led hydraulic construction
Ziang Liu (University of Hong Kong)

ASIVE:  Work and Wages
(chair: Jacob Weisdorf) (Harvard 402)

How many jobs? Division of labour in early-modern England and Wales
Patrick Wallis (London School of Economics), David Chilosi (King’s College London) & Giampaolo Lecce (University of Groningen)

Wage determination and the institutions of the early-modern labour market
Judy Stephenson (University College London)

Servants’ wages and labour market competitiveness: Evidence from England and Wales, 1780-1834
Moritz Kaiser (University of Tübingen)

ASIVF:  Modern Economic Transitions
(chair: Ronan Lyons) (Room 409)

When Bimetallism encountered Gold Standard: A study of floating dual exchange rates on China’s trade and prices, 1870-1910
Meng Wu (University of Manchester)

Why was structural adjustment so successful in Ghana?
Gareth Austin (University of Cambridge)

70 years of Scottish National Accounts with and without North Sea Oil, 1948-2018
Graeme Roy, Niall Mackenzie (University of Glasgow) & Sandy Stewart (Scottish Government)

ASIVG:  Round Table on Networks in Economic History: Seeing the Unseen (Women’s Committee Session)
(chair: Jennifer Aston) (Harvard 403)

Institutional voids?: Business-Government networks in turbulent economies
Emily Buchnea (Northumbria University)

Networks, trust, and risk mitigation: lessons from late 18th-century transatlantic trade
Carolyn Downs (Lancaster University)

Agent, sentiment and The Baring Crisis of 1890
Tehreem Husain (London School of Economics)

ASIVH:  Incomes and Inequality in the Low Countries and Italy
(chair: Leandro Prados de la Escosura) (Room 410)

Income inequality in the Netherlands, 1860-1920: a panel study
Auke Rijpma, Eva van der Heijden, Rick Schouten (Utrecht University) & Paul Puschmann (Radboud University)

Wealth, inheritance, and concentration: An ‘old’ new perspective on Italy and its regions from Unification to the Great War
Giacomo Gabbuti (Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna) & Salvatore Morelli (Università di Roma Tre)

From Great Famine to Golden Age. In search for the origins of the ‘Tiny Divergence’: Wages and prices in three Dutch regions, 1300-1600
Alexandra de Pleijt (Wageningen University), Jan Huiting & Jan Luiten van Zanden (Utrecht University)

1730-1830        EHS Annual General Meeting (Harvard 403)

1915-2000        Conference Reception & Book Launch (all delegates invited) (The Biscuit Factory)
Kindly supported by: Boydell & Brewer, CUP, The Business School & Department of Humanities (Northumbria University)

2000                 Conference Dinner (The Biscuit Factory)

Bar available until late (The Biscuit Factory)


Sunday 7 April

0930-1130        Academic Session V (8 parallel sessions)

ASVA:   Education
(chair: Emily Buchnea) (Room 007)

Apprentices’ petitions about ‘immoderate’ correction from the Middlesex and Westminster Sessions, c. 1690 to 1820: some causes and consequences
Hillary Taylor (University of Padua)

Innocence and experience: Early childhood education as an externality in late 18th-century London
Louis Henderson (University of Oxford)

The knowledge economy in 19th-century north-east England: the case of geology and mining
Tim Barmby (Newcastle University)

“Girls shall not go to school”: Education gender (In)equality in Early Republican Turkey
Yasin Arslantaş (Anadolu University)

ASVB:   British Decline
(chair: Jim Tomlinson) (Harvard 402)

The decline and fall of the British economy, 1850-2020
Robert Allen (NYU, Abu Dhabi)

The death and life of Great British cities
Alex Trew (University of Glasgow), Stephan Heblich (University of Toronto), Yanos Zylberberg (University of Bristol) & David Nagy (CREI)

The composition of Britain’s interwar economic elite: ‘business models’, human capital characteristics, and welfare impacts
Peter Scott (University of Reading)

The mismeasure of man: Why intergenerational occupational mobility is much lower than conventionally measured, England, 1837-2022
Gregory Clark, Matthew Curtis (University of Southern Denmark) & Neil Cummins (London School of Economics)

ASVC:   Politics in the Short Run
(chair: Paoli Di Martino) (Room 024)

The American origin of the French Revolution
Lukas Rosenberger (LMU Munich) & Sebastian Ottinger (CERGE-EI)

Returns to politics under a changing political system
Bas Machielsen (Utrecht University)

Becoming political: How marching suffragists facilitated women’s electoral participation in England
Valeria Rueda (University of Nottingham) & Mona Morgan-Collins (King’s College London)

Bank failures and elite democratic consent: An exploration with individual panel data
Enrique Jorge-Sotelo, Francesc Amat (Universitat de Barcelona) & Pau Vall-Prat (Universidad Carlos III de Madrid)

ASVD:   Colonialism in Asia
(chair: Meng Wu) (Room 223A)

Freedom, faith, and finance: State capacity, market structure, and trade finance in the Spanish Empire as seen by the Treasury of Manila, 1722-1788
Juan José Rivas Moreno (University College London)

Sugar exports, population, and human capital in the 19th-century Philippines
Jose Rowell Corpuz (University of Warwick) & Jean-Pascal Bassino (ENS Lyon)

Tax farming and state capacity: Evidence from colonial Indonesia
Mark Hup (Peking University)

Colonial origins of human capital and employment: Evidence from Japanese Taiwan
Muhammad Habibur Rahman (Durham University), Yit Wey Liew, Grace Lee Hooi Yean & Audrey Kim Lan Siah (Monash University)

ASVE:   Wage Earning and Living Standards in Rural Economies c.1300-1650
(chair: Jane Whittle) (Room 223B)

The role of women as agricultural wage workers in medieval England
Grace Owen (University of Exeter)

‘Everyone’s a winner, maybe?’ The differential impact of the Black Death on the remuneration of agricultural workers in late medieval England
Jordan Claridge (London School of Economics), Vincent Delabastita (Radboud University) & Spike Gibbs (University of Mannheim)

The cottage economy of 16th-century Sweden
Martin Andersson (Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)

Life-cycle changes of northern rural wage workers’ living standards, 1580-1620
Li Jiang (University of Exeter)

ASVF:   Size and Shape of Entrepreneurship in Britain, 1860-1920
(chair: John Turner) (Room 409)

Business partnerships in a British industrial city: The case of Glasgow, 1861-81
Graeme Acheson, Gill Newton (University of Strathclyde), Linda Perriton (University of Stirling) & Eoin McLaughlin (Heriot Watt University)

The consuming city: Women and their businesses in late Victorian Glasgow
Linda Perriton (University of Stirling)

The population of large British firms in 1881: what explains scale?
Robert Bennett (University of Cambridge)

The economic consequences of the War: The transformational effects of the Great War on the British corporate elite
Michael Aldous & Robin Adams (Queen’s University Belfast)

ASVG:   Occupational Structure and Economic Development in Eurasia
(chair: Patrick Wallis) (Room 410)

Occupational structure and potential for economic growth: 18th-century England and France
Leigh Shaw-Taylor & Alexis Litvine (University of Cambridge)

Zooming in and out: Using 19th-century Ottoman microdata to study population and economic geography at the macro and micro level
Efe Erünal (Koç University)

By-employment in the Yangtze Valley in the long 20th century: specialisation, structural change, and land systems
Ying Dai (University of Cambridge)

Breaking the HISCO barrier: AI and occupational data standardisation
Christian Vedel & Christian Møller (University of Southern Denmark)

ASVH:   Inequality in Ancient Societies
(chair: Stephen Broadberry) (Harvard 403)

Political organisation, hierarchy, and wealth inequality in ancient Southwest Asia, c.10,000-400 BCE
Mattia Fochesato (Bocconi University) & Giacomo Benati (Universitat de Barcelona)

Income inequality in ancient empires: The Roman and the Han compared
Guido Alfani (Bocconi University) & Michele Bolla (University of Cambridge)

Knowledge for lineage: Queen, Keju and social mobility in Tang China
Sijie Hu (Renmin University of China) & Shuo Chen (Fudan University)

New estimates of European inequality trends from antiquity to the early-modern period: evidence from bioarchaeological sources
Jörg Baten (University of Tübingen)

1130-1200        Coffee (CCE1 Foyer)

1200-1315        Tawney Lecture (Lecture Theatre 002)

       Back to the future. How economic history can gain more relevance by abandoning modernization thinking
             Bas van Bavel (Utrecht University)

1315-1415        Lunch (CCE1 foyer)

1315-1415        Job Market: session for students and postdocs (Room 223A)

1415                     Conference ends

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