T.S. Ashton Prize

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The T.S. Ashton Prize, established with funds donated by the late Professor T.S. Ashton (1889-1968), will be awarded annually, at the Annual Conference, to the author of the best article accepted for publication in the Economic History Review in the previous two calendar years, who satisfies one of the following conditions at time of submission:

  • The author is within five years of receipt of her/his PhD;
    OR
  • The author normally has no previous publication in the field of economic and/or social history, or a closely related field.

The prize is currently £750.

  • Past winners
    • 2020: Chapman, J. (2019), ‘The contribution of infrastructure investment to Britain’s urban mortality decline, 1861–1900’, Economic History Review, 72: 233-259. doi:10.1111/ehr.12699
    • 2019: Michiel de Haas (Wageningen University), ‘Measuring rural welfare in colonial Africa: did Uganda’s smallholders thrive?’,  Economic History Review, 70, May 2017. AND Judy Z Stephenson (London School of Economics), ‘”Real” wages? Contractors, workers, and pay in London building trades, 1650-1800’,  Economic History Review, vol, February 2018.
    • 2017: Charles Read (University of Cambridge), ‘Laissez‐faire, the Irish famine, and British financial crisis’, Economic History Review, 69 (2) pp.411–34. More.
    • 2015: Eric B Schneider (University of Sussex), ‘Prices and production: agricultural supply response in fourteenth-century England’, Economic History Review 67 (1), pp.66-91.
    • 2013: Philip Slavin (McGill University), ‘The Great Bovine Pestilence and its economic and environmental consequences in England and Wales, 1318-50’, Economic History Review 65 (4) (2012), pp.1239-1266.
    • 2011: David Chambers (University of Cambridge),‘Gentlemanly capitalism revisited: a case study of the underpricing of IPOs on the London Stock Exchange 1946-86’, Economic History Review 62(1) (2009), pp.31-56.
    • 2009: Jordi Domenech (University of York), ‘Labour market adjustment a hundred years ago: the case of the Catalan textile industry, 1880-1913’, Economic History Review, 61 (1) February 2008, pp.1-25. AND Nick Draper (University College London), ‘The city of London and slavery: evidence from the first dock companies, 1795-1800’,Economic History Review, 61 (2) May 2008, pp.432-466.
    • 2007: Samantha Williams (University of Cambridge), ‘Poor relief, labourers’ households and living standards in rural England c.1770-1834: a Bedfordshire case study’, Economic History Review, 58 (3) May 2005, pp.485-519.
    • 2005: Ben Dodds (University of Durham), ‘Estimating arable output using Durham Priory tithe receipts, 1341-1450’,Economic History Review, 57 (2) May 2004, pp.245-85.
    • 2003: Byung-Yeon Kim (University of Essex), ‘Causes of repressed inflation in the Soviet consumer market, 1965-1989’, Economic History Review, 55 (1) February 2002, pp.105-27.
    • 2001: Evan Jones (University of Bristol), ‘Illicit business: accounting for smuggling in mid-sixteenth-century Bristol’, Economic History Review, 54 (1) February 2001, pp.17-38.
    • 1999: Brian A’Hearn, ‘Institutions, externalities, and economic growth in southern Italy: evidence from the cotton textile industry, 1861-1914’ (Volume 51, Issue 4, 1998)
    • 1997: Joyce Burnette, ‘An investigation of the female-male wage gap during the Industrial Revolution in Britain’ (Volume 50, Issue 2, 1998)
    • 1995: Mark Bailey, ‘Demographic decline in late Medieval England’ (Volume 49, Issue 1, 1996) AND
      Duncan M Ross,‘Commercial banking in a market-oriented financial system: Britain between the Wars’ (Volume 49, Issue 2, 1996)
    • 1993: David EH Edgerton & Sally M Horrocks, ‘British industrial research and development before 1945’ (Volume 47, Issue 2, 1994)
    • 1991: Richard W Hoyle, ‘Tenure and the land market in early Modern England’ (Volume 43, Issue 1, 1990)
    • 1989: No prize awarded
    • 1987: Christine MacLeod,‘The 1960s patent boom: invention or stock-jobbing?’ (Volume 39, Issue 4, 1986)
    • 1985: Mark Thomas, ‘Rearmament and economic recovery in the late 1930s’ (Volume 36, Issue 4, 1983)
    • 1983: RJ Overy, ‘Hitler’s war and the German economy: a reinterpretation’ (Volume 35, Issue 2, 1982)
    • 1981: No prize awarded
    • 1980: JV Beckett, ‘Regional variation and the agricultural depression, 1730-50’ (Volume 35, Issue 1, 1982)
    • 1979: Roger Middleton, ‘The constant employment budget balance and British budgetary policy, 1929-39’ (Volume 34, Issue 2, 1981)
    • 1977: WD Rubinstein, ‘The Victorian middle classes: wealth, occupation and geography’ (Volume 30, Issue 4, 1977) AND
      D Cannadine, ‘Aristocratic indebtedness in the nineteenth century: the case reopened’ (Volume 30, Issue 4, 1977)
    • 1976: VAC Gatrell, ‘Labour, power, and the size of firms in Lancashire cotton in the second quarter of the nineteent century’ (Volume 30, Issue 1, 1977)
    • 1975: No prize awarded
    • 1974: Peter E Dewey, ‘Agricultural labour supply in England and Wales during the First World War’ (Volume 28, Issue 1, 1975)
    • 1973: Susan Howson, ‘The origins of dear money, 1919-20’ (Volume 27, Issue 1, 1974)
    • 1972: PJ Cain ‘Railway combination and government, 1900-14’ (Volume 25, Issue 4, 1972)
    • 1971: No prize awarded
    • 1970: Prize inaugurated
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